#7 What is the #60Challenge?

I’m feeling good about my new blog and recent posts. I want to take a minute to clarify a few housekeeping items…

1. I have started several blogs over the years, but most didn’t last longer than a few posts. So far, I feel like this new blog is a win. Thanks for those who have retweeted or given enthusiastic feedback. It keeps me going. Really.

2. I was intending, and even in the process of planning, a relaunch of this blog when Bo Adams (@boadams1) shared the idea of the 60-60-60 Challenge with me. From his own blog, here is the challenge…

“I will post 60 ideas for educational change in the form of “what if” questions, I will do so for 60 days straight, and I will constrain my posts to around 60 words each (and maybe an image, an embedded TED talk, etc.).”

The Original 60-60-60 Challenge on @Boadams1 blog: It’s All About the Learning

3. I have already lost the challenge. Though I have blogged consecutively for 7 days now, I have far surpassed 60 words and not every post is about ideas for educational change. (Guess I should’ve read the challenge more carefully.)

4. I’m okay with that. I have renamed the hashtag attached to this 60 day experience (thanks @scitechyedu – Mary Cantwell!) simply #60Challenge. My goal is to blog consecutively for 60 days with a minimum of 60 characters and no constraints on my topics, format, or amount of media attached. (I’m already at 205 words in this post. yikes!)

Thanks for reading! Please continue to follow and to share.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership

What Swimming Taught Me About LeadershipWhat Swimming Taught Me About Leadership

Be the first one off the blocks
“Swimmers take your mark. Bang!” Any swimmer will tell you that in a race, every detail matters. The start, the turn, the position of your body are all critical to keeping the edge you need to win a close one. Swimmers are fanatics. We shave our arms, legs, and heads just to shave one second of our fastest time. Your first and best chance to win a race is to be the first one off the blocks and into the water. It takes a lot of practice, planning, and preparation to be ready for this moment. It lasts less than one second. If you false start, you get disqualified. If you hesitate, you’ve lost. You must be ready to seize the earliest opportunity to win.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Freshman swimmer at Marymount

Your goggles will come off. Don’t panic
After my embarrassing failure in the 100 IM, I learned how to dive in so that my goggles were less likely to come off upon entry. In subsequent races, I became adept at pulling the goggles down around my neck, ripping them up off my head, and even breathing with my mouth half obstructed. Despite vigilant preparation, unexpected moments still occur. You must be able to remain calm and adapt quickly.

At MU, Coach Clark had a bucket of goggles that were painted with opaque, black paint. We learned how to count our strokes and swim without sight. He had us practice on Sunday nights. With the lights out. I knew precisely how many strokes it took to get across 25 yards of water with my eyes closed. Eleven.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership

Finish strong
As a coach, I hammered this into the hearts and minds of my swimmers. The end of the race is when we are most tired. I trained myself and others to push hardest at precisely this moment. Get there first. Put your head down and don’t even think about turning your head to take a breath. Leave it in the pool. Picture swimming beyond the wall 10 yards through the concrete. Coach Clark used to say, “Swim past the pain.”

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Finishing strong in my last home meet as a Leafmore Dolphin.

Be coachable
After winning county, I couldn’t fathom that I had more to learn about swimming. Coach Clark showed me I was wrong. As cliche as it sounds, I truly learned that hard work pays off. I adopted the belief that growth beyond what you can imagine is possible. You have to be open to what others can teach you from their wisdom and experience if you want to be the best. Seek wisdom. Seek mentors.

Be a Coach
The scales are balanced between my fulfillment as a swimmer vs. swim coach. I wouldn’t be good at one without the other. I learned as much in my role as coach as I did swimming. Sharing your unique knowledge and skills is a gift. Teach others. Celebrate when they surpass you.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Giving a swim lesson in 2001 in the same spot where I learned in 1983 at Leafmore.

Late bloomers should not be underestimated or counted out
Sometimes they go the farthest.

Since the summer of 1983, swimming has been a huge part of my life. The pool was located beyond the woods at the end of our neighborhood cul-de-sac. My first official lessons were at Leafmore Creek Park.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
With my Dad and sister in 1982

Two summers later I joined the swim team as a wide-eyed newcomer. Most kids my age joined the swim several years earlier. I had some natural ability and a lot of fun at the pool, but I cried when the coach put me in the 100 IM (Individual Medley – one lap of each stroke) because I was not confident about swimming butterfly or the distance of four laps.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Showing off our ribbons the morning after a swim meet.

The coach and my parents gave me a pep talk and convinced me to get in the race. They saw potential in me that I did not yet see. I choked on my goggles and they had to pull me out midway through the first lap. It was embarrassing, but I didn’t quit.

In 1993, I was hired as an assistant coach. I joined Dynamo and committed to life as a ‘year round’ swimmer. In 1994, I was the fastest 15 & over in Dekalb County in 50 yard freestyle and 50 yard breaststroke at the championship meet. I was a late bloomer.

I continued swimming in college at Marymount University my freshman year. Coach Clark completely changed my stroke technique and I became much faster. I broke 3 individual school records and 4 relay records. After one year, I transferred to UGA and my career as a swimmer was over. My career as a swim coach was just beginning.

I coached the Leafmore Dolphins from 1993 to 1999. Our team was undefeated 5-0 in 1999, a feat that had not been accomplished at Leafmore in 30 years. The last time the Leafmore Dolphins were undefeated was in 1969. They were coached by another UGA graduate, Phil Houston, my Dad.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Coach Houston (my Dad) in red shorts on right 1969.
What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Coach Houston (me) on left in blue shorts 2009.

I returned to coach the Dolphins from 2006 to 2009. Once again, the team was undefeated 5-0. Leading the swim team at Leafmore was my favorite job.

Swimming led to many great opportunities including the chance to volunteer at the 1996 Olympics where I had full access to the pool deck and met some incredible athletes and people.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Meeting President Jimmy Carter at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. Swimming gave me countless opportunities.

 

 

#5 Why Conduct Student Surveys?

Why should teachers solicit feedback from their students at the end of the semester?

The answer is simple. Growth.

Our team and our school promote this practice in our five year strategic plan as well as the standards of professional excellence by which we coach and evaluate our teachers.

Seek feedback and measure attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs of students about their work and contribution within the classroom environment. -iPlan17

We also highly value the idea and posture of Carol Dweck’s Growth Mindset. (For more on this concept, see post #6 of the #60-60-60Challenge tomorrow.)

growthmindset

Here are some key thoughts for educators and teams to consider…

Students should be invited to reflect and share feedback about their learning in each class at the end of each semester.

Teachers participate in writing the survey questions.

Phrase questions to elicit specific, constructive feedback.

Discard destructive comments and personal attacks or matters of personal taste vs. good practice. (ex: Kids may not like the practice of a daily essential question, but if done properly, it is good practice and should be continued.)

Pay attention to patterns of consistent, recurring comments.

Pay attention to comments that describe specific behavior.

Filter every comment through the perspective that kids are honest, yet they are still kids.

Ask why.

growth

What has caused you to grow the most in your field? What are your thoughts and experiences with end of course student surveys?

Why ePortfolios? Workspace & Showcase

If you try to follow #eportfolios on twitter, you may be disappointed. When you search and view samples of ePortfolios on the internet, you will find several schools with templates and beginnings. You won’t find many quality ones in the grade levels proceeding college. At least I haven’t yet. Many of them appear more like resumes than an instrument that not only documents learning but accelerates it, too.

This summer, our team is designing an ePortfolio for students spanning Preschool through Grade 12. The team consists of representatives from Preschool, Lower School, Middle School, and Upper School working together to create one cohesive platform. It will look a little different at each level to meet the needs of the students. For example, Preschoolers will require greater teacher assistance to curate, reflect, and upload their demonstrations of learning while Upper School students will possess greater autonomy.

Regardless of age, what is the purpose of student ePortfolios? Why do they exist? Why should they exist?

As a Workspace…

1. Document Student Learning – At a national level (and elsewhere), when we hear about the state of education, we hear about test scores. There are so many better and alternative ways to measure student growth and performance. ePortfolios lend themselves to constructed learning by design. The status quo for assessing student learning is and has been selected response learning (ex: multiple choice questions, give me four choices and I will select one. this tends to require little critical or creative thinking). Schools must employ a comprehensive and balanced approach to assessments. Teachers must design more units and assessments that encourage and require students to construct a unique and original response.

2. Accelerate Student Learning – Students who actively engage in their learning not only retain more knowledge but develop higher order thinking skills. Are we only force feeding content and standards? When do students get to choose their own learning path and pursue unique interests? An ePortfolio must include student reflection. It must include feedback from peers, teachers, parents, and external experts. It is a way to engage the greater community and inspire others to deeper learning or new discoveries.

As a Showcase…

3. Serve as a Discussion Starter for Student Led Parent Conferences – Have you ever wondered why parent teacher conferences often exclude the most important party; the student? Sometimes, it is more appropriate for the adults to meet, but I think we miss an opportunity to not only include the student in the conference, but to ask them to lead it. As they lead, students should leverage their e-portfolio as the starting point to showcase their learning and even highlight their areas of struggle, too.

4. Serve as a Discussion Starter for College Acceptance/Interviews – What does the SAT measure? And why do we care? Why do we put so much weight and emphasis on a limited tool with a narrow frame. How do we measure creativity? Ethical decision making? As a Director of Admissions, I relied on a comprehensive approach that included standardized test scores, but we did not hang our hat on them at the exclusion of other gauges including the required items (transcripts, interviews, application questions, writing samples, recommendations) and the un-required touch points (every interaction was a chance to get to know an applicant, to ask questions, observe behavior, and communicate an expectation. many team members were included in the interactions.) It takes more time to be thorough and relational. It is simply easier to pin it all on a test taken on a Saturday morning. Kinda lazy yet convenient. And a money making machine, too. I’d like to see more authentic measures begin to take over.

eportfolios eportfolios eportfolios eportfolios

What other purposes can you think of for a student ePortfolio? Also, what questions do you have? Please share.

Tear Down Classroom Walls With Learning Walks

One of the most untapped and useful resources available to us is the experience, practice, and expertise of the professional colleagues on our own campus. Learning Walk are a fun, inexpensive way to immediately impact your own educational practice. As lifelong learners, we seek professional and personal growth through many avenues including conferences, webinars, articles, in-service workshops, presentations, twitter, blogs, etc. These are all elements of our PLNs (Professional Learning Networks). Learning Walks are another powerful, yet underutilized element. This practice is one key towards establishing a professional learning community. Each teacher is expected to complete one learning walk per semester as part of their professional evaluation, but we encourage you to conduct as many learning walks as you would like/as your schedule permits.

walk

What is a Learning Walk?

A learning walk is one part of a multi-faceted, professional learning approach designed to give educators access to their peers’ expertise in short, focused observations. It is an opportunity to unashamedly borrow or steal the best ideas, strategies, and inspiration from our colleagues next door. It brings down walls.

What are Learning Walk norms?

Before

  • Learning Walks are not about criticizing the teachers you visit, but rather about growing yourself and seeking to glean insights from the experience and expertise of your colleagues. It’s about you directing your own growth through observation and reflection. You are there to learn.
  • Plan your walks in advance, put it on your calendar, coordinate with your Head of Grade.
  • Decide on your specific focus in advance – what are you looking for? (ie – one of the standards of professional excellence or how your vertical team members teach a specific math learning outcome, essential outcomes, assessments, use of technology, etc.). Limit your focus to 1-2 specific practices.

During

  • Learning Walks should take 20-30 minutes max. Keep each visit brief – 1-5 minutes in each classroom.
  • Observe an entire hallway, building, or vertical team, not just one or two people.
  • Learning Walks may or may not be announced in advance. If unannounced, when you enter, you can say, “I’m on a learning walk – just ignore me.”
  • If you are being observed, keep teaching. Don’t stop.
  • Quietly observe and ask students questions – look for student learning.
  • Take notes on what you discover/learn, especially about your specific focus.
  • Take a picture. (If you plan to share it on twitter, etc. – make sure it represents the School in a positive light (Be a raving fun publicly).

After

  • Within 24 hours, email the teachers with positive, specific praise about something you learned and took away from their practice.
  • Tweet about what you see – try to share useful, applicable practices to other teachers who follow…
  • #learningwalk  #MVMiddle  #MVPSchool (use these hashtags in your tweets so we can all benefit).
  • Implement something specific that you learned in your own classroom.

Throwback Post: My Big Break on 99X

chip 99X my big break
Barnes & Leslie – The Morning X – 9/18/2001

Originally published on blogger.com on August 2, 2005.

It was September 10, 2001; the eve of the first terrorist attack on America. I had long hair and was a regular attendee of Eddie’s Attic, usually 3-4 nights a week. I had managed to overhear that John Mayer (who was just on the verge of celebrity, but still a local musician) was performing a private gig for close friends and family. My friends at the Attic got me in to see the show.

While there, I ran into a friend of a friend who went to my high school who was married to 99X DJ Steve Barnes. Barnes was a famous radio personality on the most popular morning show in Atlanta radio. It was fun to meet him and I enjoyed chatting with them both. I thought nothing of it and after John’s show was over, I went home. (Home, by the way, was a basement apartment in a family’s home, but that’s a story for another day)

The next morning I awoke around 9AM. I checked my phone messages only to hear the two most incredible messages of all time. First, came the message from Barnes.

“Hey Chip, this is Barnes. I enjoyed meeting you last night and got to thinking that you should come in tomorrow morning and play live on the radio. We have a program called ‘My Big Break’ and you need to be one it. Call me around 5am if you want to come in.”

AGHGHGHGH! I had totally slept through it! I missed a chance to be on the radio. This would have been huge. After all, it had only been 4 months since I quit my job to become a full time songwriter. This was my chance to be heard by the world. Or at least Metro Atlanta.

Then, the second message:

“Chip, this is your mother. We’re under attack. Wake up and get to a television!”

What!? There was my mom overexaggerating some story again, waking me up too early. I couldn’t have even imagined what I was about to discover when I turned on the news. I saw the second plane hit. I felt desperation and rage all at once. I was stunned, paralyzed, mouth gaping, motionless on the edge of the couch. Disbelief. Vulernability.

At some point during the hours of the day, I returned the call to Barnes. He told me that it would be at least a week or two, but that he would make arrangements for me to come in to the station to perform. Meanwhile, he said, “We’ve got to deal with this.”

The morning arrived for “My Big Break.” I rose early, warmed up my vocals and made my way to 99X. It was all very exciting as I felt privileged to see the inner working of such a popular radio station, much less to share one of my original songs with my hometown. I played “Aimless” and did a brief interview with Barnes and Leslie. Jimmy Barron was absent that day. Leslie asked me how committed I was to this life of an independent musician. I told her that someone once told me “it takes 10 years to become an overnight success” and that’s what i would give it. The feedback was immediate and large. There were many phone calls to the station and I got to talk to lots of cool folks. My email was flooded when I got home with congratulations from friends and family and praise from total strangers. I even had an email from an A & R rep with Warner Bros. Nothing ever came of it, though. I had taken a huge step forward, but I was still very green as a songwriter/performer. In many ways, I still am.

Looking back now from the vantage point of 4 years later, “My Big Break” was really more like “My Little Gig,” but it gave me a great boost of confidence to keep going. As Barnes said, consider it like a “spot” given to a weightlifter. It’s just one step in a series of many intended to spur my growth and strength in the business. I’ve got 6 years to go before I become an “overnight success.”

Return to Eddie’s Attic

chip eddie's w: willi boos

Originally posted on blogger.com on Friday, July 29, 2005 at 1:43 p.m.

Return to Eddie’s Attic

Last night marked my return to Eddie’s Attic, the premiere acoustic venue in the Southeast, if not the nation. Having said that, I’m not sure what I was doing on the stage, but life is full of little mercies and graces.

I played a 45 minute, solo set to an intimate crowd of about 50. The feeling was that of a homecoming. Not only because it was my first gig in the Attic in 12 months, but also because there is a new owner, Bob Ephlin, who has the vision and the ability to bring the “magic” back to Eddie’s and take it to new places. In a stroke of pure genius, Bob’s first act as new owner was to hire former owner and namesake Eddie Owen as the Director of Operations. Wow!

Back in the heyday, I thought of the Attic as my own little tree fort. John Mayer used to work the door for $40 in 1998. Shawn Mullins and Josh Joplin were our own little-known, local discoveries before they were signed and put into heavy rotation on the airwaves. And the smell of Eddie’s pipe permeated the patio where you could count on meeting a number of interesting acoustic music lovers and players.

Anyway, it is good to be back. I wish Bob and the Attic great success!