Hacking ePortfolios

Hacking ePortfolios

(cue sudden, startling music)
There’s been an awakening. Have you felt it?

Our school launched eportfolios a few years ago. Feedback from students and teachers confirms we have not yet cracked the code on how to use them effectively. Why not?

Hacking eporfolios

Lack of clear purpose
Middle School kids don’t have to be coaxed into seeing the relevance of Instagram or Snapchat. It’s social. It’s about them. It’s a way to share and be ‘in the know.’ In fact, not being part of it leads to a desperate feeling of being on the outside. The purpose of eportfolios has the potential to be similarly compelling, but not the way we’ve currently designed it.

From a school’s point of view, eportfolios have multiple purposes. In my opinion, there are two primary reasons to use them: workspace and showcase. Workspace means the portfolio is a tool to increase learning (and reflection of learning). Showcase means it is a way to measure learning (an additional gauge beyond grades). One is formative. The other is summative. Students could care less about either.

To increase student engagement with eportfolios, we must find ways to incorporate more of the elements they love about Instagram and other things on which they obsessively focus. Can teachers somehow ‘jedi mind trick’ them into wanting to use eportfolios for workspaces and showcases? From a student’s perspective, what is the purpose of an eportfolio? And why should they care?

Too school centered
Students have goals and teachers have goals. And never the twain shall meet? Let the students decide what to upload, at least to jumpstart the conversation and active use of eportfolios. They will be more likely to accept some of the learning outcome/learning measure stuff teachers want them to do if we first listen and accept what they care about posting. And show them how to do it in ways they haven’t imagined.
Hacking eportfoliosAudience too small
After all the labor spent, who sees a student’s work? No one really. The teacher may see it, but the teacher sees the student’s work every day. What’s so special about that? Current settings keep the work private. The world has no access. What if we could expand the audience? Like a true blog, the appeal is the potential for the entire globe to have access (at least those with internet access). How can we enable students to see one another’s eportfolios? Let students from other divisions or schools view and comment. External experts or experts in residence could mentor specific students on their posts, providing valuable feedback unique to their field. Pair up with students in another city, state, or country and share out. Create a mini convention like the old social science fair. Invite guests, parents, community members, and others to view, ask questions in person, and give feedback.
Hacking eportfoliosToo many tech steps
Students want it to be easy. So do teachers. Makes sense. Recently, I spoke with a student who explained, “In order to upload a picture to my eportfolio, I have to have my phone, but we’re not supposed to have these. Then, I can’t upload the photo directly to my eportfolio, so I have to email it to myself, but we’re not allowed to receive outside emails (school settings prevent this as a way to protect kids), so I have to login to my personal email (also not allowed during school hours), then upload it to google drive, log back into my school account, and finally upload the picture into my Digication eportfolio. But I don’t like the way it looks, it’s so 2006.”

I was exhausted just listening. I can truly empathize with how they feel. I attempted to download the WordPress app to my phone so I could experiment with instantly uploading my own photos and posts remotely. After an hour or so, and many attempts to retrieve my forgotten password, I was still unsuccessful. It’s more hassle than it’s worth. Who has time to spend trying to figure all of this stuff out?

If we want eportfolios to happen, we have to simplify the steps. We’re trying to make water flow uphill.

Questions:
What is the purpose of an eportfolio? And why should they care?

How do we make eportfolios more student centered? How do we balance student centered and school centered approaches to eportfolios?

How many ways can we expand the audience for students to showcase their learning, not just their best products?

How can we simplify the steps necessary to uploading demonstrations? What platform(s) are best for middle schoolers? upper schoolers? educators?

Resources:
Learning Through Reflection
Sample ePortfolios
ePortfolio Boot Camp
Using Google Photos

Student Feedback on ePortfolios

Student Feedback on ePortfolios

Today, students met with their conference mentors to read an article and discuss how to make e-portfolios more relevant for students. Many students do not see the need or value in this practice yet. I led a conversation with about 30 students and loved hearing their thoughts, ideas, complaints, and obstacles because I believe so fully in the power and relevance of e-portfolios as a tool for learning. There is a large gap and disconnect between our vision and the current reality of this initiative. I am totally stoked by this feedback and the conversations students are having. After all, the goal is to engage students and get them to feel a greater sense of ownership of their learning. Read the feedback and share your ideas for how to overcome some of these obstacles. It’s time to take the feedback and iterate…

more student feedback on post-it notes…

ePortfolios
I think we should be able to chose the form that we use. e-portfolio, website, blog, etc.
don’t get the point, no one sees it, we don’t really want to use it
give a reason to make e-portfolios
I think that e-portfolios can be easier and more well explained
not really worth it. if teachers want our work so bad they should upload our work to a specific folder
I think we could make it better by not making the students post often
I really do not know, just don’t make them so urgent? I do not know.
We can make it better by get a reward for posting things.
We do not need it as middle schoolers. Do not enjoy it.
Have a goal or a meaning of why we do thing.
Showcase them more. Put them to use more.
Make it easier to navigate
If MVPS needs it to get people to come to MVPS, then why don’t they do it themselves. There’s no point for students to do this when MVPS uses it themselves, not us. Do it yourself.

 

Engage All Learners

Imagine this: You are observing a class. The lights are off. The students are watching a video projected on the screen. The video is relevant to the unit of study. The students are bored. Some are paying attention. Others are leaning the sides of their faces into their palms, which are resting on their elbows, which are resting on their backpacks, which are full of stuff, zipped up, and sitting on their desks.

Why aren’t the learners taking notes? Why are they not at least answering 1-2 key questions about the big idea? Or jotting down an observation or two? Or even better, a question that might pop into their heads?

Why are the backpacks still on the desks? Why does everyone look so sleepy?

Passive consumption. Lights low. Sleepy. zzzzz….

How might the designer of this learning experience actively engage ALL learners?

  1. Invite students to put away backpacks, clear off desks. Even better, make the desks into writable surfaces.
  2. Expect the students to make some notes. Jot down some observations or questions. Or both. Provide them blank paper or a graphic organizer. Or writable surfaces.
  3. Instead of having students passively view the video, let them research and create their own. And share them with other students. In other grades. At other schools. And get feedback on them. And iterate them.

4.1.1

Class Trip to Space Camp – Day 2

Class Trip to Space Camp

Class Trip to Space Camp

Class Trip to Space Camp via Twitter Feed

Space Camp® launched in 1982 to inspire and motivate young people from around the country to join the ranks of space pioneers who persevere to push the boundaries of human exploration. Today, with attendees from all 50 states, territories and more than 60 foreign countries, the immersive program continues to challenge young people to dream of a future in space.

With the U.S. Space & Rocket Center® as home base, trainees have an unparalleled environment to spur imagination. Historic space, aviation and defense hardware, along with exhibits that highlight current and future programs help Space Camp trainees transcend from, “What if?” to “Can do!” thinking and actions. Indeed, Space Camp alumni include NASA and ESA astronauts, engineers, scientists and technologists.

Static displays and unique settings provide excellent areas for classroom instruction while hands-on training, high fidelity simulations and enthusiastic counselors ignite the singular sizzle of Space Camp. Teamwork, leadership, decision-making: from mission control to space transport to space station, trainees gain personal and professional insights that profoundly impact futures.

Space Camp is the brainchild of rocket scientist, Dr. Wernher von Braun. Von Braun led propulsion activities that launched the Apollo-era U.S. manned space program and envisioned an aggressive schedule for America’s space-bound pioneers. Von Braun, then director of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, reasoned there should be an experience for young people who were excited about space. Under the guidance of Edward O. Buckbee, the first director of the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, Space Camp was born.

Camps are available for fourth grade through high school-age students. Additional programs are offered for trainees who are blind or visually impaired, deaf or hard of hearing and those who have other special needs. Space Camp programs are also available for adults, educators, corporate groups and families. Family programs may include children as young as seven years old.

Space Camp has attracted more than 600,000 trainees since its inception.