Be a Multiplier

Be a MultiplierMount Vernon Presbyterian School kicked off the new year at convocation as students from the Class of 2016 all the way to the Class of 2030 gathered to hear Head of School Dr. Jacobsen’s message: Be a Multiplier!

Sharing the parable of the talents as told by Jesus in Matthew 25, Dr. Jacobsen encouraged students, parents, and faculty to multiply the blessings and talents we’ve been given in the coming 180 days (177 now for those counting).

You + Curiosity = Multiplier

You + Desired Result = Multiplier

You + Others = Multiplier

You + God = Multiplier

14 “Again, it will be like a man going on a journey, who called his servants and entrusted his wealth to them. 15 To one he gave five bags of gold, to another two bags, and to another one bag, each according to his ability. Then he went on his journey. 16 The man who had received five bags of gold went at once and put his money to work and gained five bags more. 17 So also, the one with two bags of gold gained two more. 18 But the man who had received one bag went off, dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s money.”

– The Parable of Talents (or Bags of Gold) – Matthew 25:14-18

Be a Multiplier
Be a Multiplier

I Became a Teacher Because…

 

Social Studies Teacher at Dunwoody High School
Social Studies Teacher at Dunwoody High – 2001

I became a teacher because…

1. Growing up in my neighborhood, I was the oldest kid of “our gang.” I enjoyed being the leader. In contrast, in my own grade level, I was a late bloomer and one of the youngest which often meant I felt behind my peers. Comparing these two groups and my status in each one led me to enjoy leading and teaching others.

2. One of my first jobs as a swim coach helped me realize how much I enjoyed teaching others. Swimming was one thing I was really good at and it was fulfilling to have a unique knowledge/skill that I could lead others to develop in themselves.

3. I always enjoyed history (that’s my ‘context’ strength) and usually made “A’s”. History is fun for me. Teaching history forced me to learn far more than I ever did as a student. I feel like I have a fairly solid concept of human history and that context helps me to interpret the world today. Studying the relationships and events of the past reveals clues about relationships and events in my own life. Despite thousands of years, human nature is essentially the same. (If they say, why? why? Tell ’em that it’s human nature)

4. I started out as an International Business major, but hated Accounting 1 & 2. It wasn’t Sister PJ’s fault. I just didn’t enjoy it. Eventually, it led me to change my major to education. This led me back to Georgia.

5. After much soul searching in my freshman year, I realized that while my grand goal as an 18 year old of being a millionaire by age 30, driving a black BMW with leather seats, and living in a castle in Germany was not as motivating as I once thought. I discovered I was much more motivated by leading and influencing others to be their best.

Why did you become a teacher? I want every teacher reading this to know that I hope you will respond in the comments section. I really am interested to learn what led you to become a teacher/educator, too.

#7 What is the #60Challenge?

I’m feeling good about my new blog and recent posts. I want to take a minute to clarify a few housekeeping items…

1. I have started several blogs over the years, but most didn’t last longer than a few posts. So far, I feel like this new blog is a win. Thanks for those who have retweeted or given enthusiastic feedback. It keeps me going. Really.

2. I was intending, and even in the process of planning, a relaunch of this blog when Bo Adams (@boadams1) shared the idea of the 60-60-60 Challenge with me. From his own blog, here is the challenge…

“I will post 60 ideas for educational change in the form of “what if” questions, I will do so for 60 days straight, and I will constrain my posts to around 60 words each (and maybe an image, an embedded TED talk, etc.).”

The Original 60-60-60 Challenge on @Boadams1 blog: It’s All About the Learning

3. I have already lost the challenge. Though I have blogged consecutively for 7 days now, I have far surpassed 60 words and not every post is about ideas for educational change. (Guess I should’ve read the challenge more carefully.)

4. I’m okay with that. I have renamed the hashtag attached to this 60 day experience (thanks @scitechyedu – Mary Cantwell!) simply #60Challenge. My goal is to blog consecutively for 60 days with a minimum of 60 characters and no constraints on my topics, format, or amount of media attached. (I’m already at 205 words in this post. yikes!)

Thanks for reading! Please continue to follow and to share.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership

What Swimming Taught Me About LeadershipWhat Swimming Taught Me About Leadership

Be the first one off the blocks
“Swimmers take your mark. Bang!” Any swimmer will tell you that in a race, every detail matters. The start, the turn, the position of your body are all critical to keeping the edge you need to win a close one. Swimmers are fanatics. We shave our arms, legs, and heads just to shave one second of our fastest time. Your first and best chance to win a race is to be the first one off the blocks and into the water. It takes a lot of practice, planning, and preparation to be ready for this moment. It lasts less than one second. If you false start, you get disqualified. If you hesitate, you’ve lost. You must be ready to seize the earliest opportunity to win.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Freshman swimmer at Marymount

Your goggles will come off. Don’t panic
After my embarrassing failure in the 100 IM, I learned how to dive in so that my goggles were less likely to come off upon entry. In subsequent races, I became adept at pulling the goggles down around my neck, ripping them up off my head, and even breathing with my mouth half obstructed. Despite vigilant preparation, unexpected moments still occur. You must be able to remain calm and adapt quickly.

At MU, Coach Clark had a bucket of goggles that were painted with opaque, black paint. We learned how to count our strokes and swim without sight. He had us practice on Sunday nights. With the lights out. I knew precisely how many strokes it took to get across 25 yards of water with my eyes closed. Eleven.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership

Finish strong
As a coach, I hammered this into the hearts and minds of my swimmers. The end of the race is when we are most tired. I trained myself and others to push hardest at precisely this moment. Get there first. Put your head down and don’t even think about turning your head to take a breath. Leave it in the pool. Picture swimming beyond the wall 10 yards through the concrete. Coach Clark used to say, “Swim past the pain.”

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Finishing strong in my last home meet as a Leafmore Dolphin.

Be coachable
After winning county, I couldn’t fathom that I had more to learn about swimming. Coach Clark showed me I was wrong. As cliche as it sounds, I truly learned that hard work pays off. I adopted the belief that growth beyond what you can imagine is possible. You have to be open to what others can teach you from their wisdom and experience if you want to be the best. Seek wisdom. Seek mentors.

Be a Coach
The scales are balanced between my fulfillment as a swimmer vs. swim coach. I wouldn’t be good at one without the other. I learned as much in my role as coach as I did swimming. Sharing your unique knowledge and skills is a gift. Teach others. Celebrate when they surpass you.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Giving a swim lesson in 2001 in the same spot where I learned in 1983 at Leafmore.

Late bloomers should not be underestimated or counted out
Sometimes they go the farthest.

Since the summer of 1983, swimming has been a huge part of my life. The pool was located beyond the woods at the end of our neighborhood cul-de-sac. My first official lessons were at Leafmore Creek Park.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
With my Dad and sister in 1982

Two summers later I joined the swim team as a wide-eyed newcomer. Most kids my age joined the swim several years earlier. I had some natural ability and a lot of fun at the pool, but I cried when the coach put me in the 100 IM (Individual Medley – one lap of each stroke) because I was not confident about swimming butterfly or the distance of four laps.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Showing off our ribbons the morning after a swim meet.

The coach and my parents gave me a pep talk and convinced me to get in the race. They saw potential in me that I did not yet see. I choked on my goggles and they had to pull me out midway through the first lap. It was embarrassing, but I didn’t quit.

In 1993, I was hired as an assistant coach. I joined Dynamo and committed to life as a ‘year round’ swimmer. In 1994, I was the fastest 15 & over in Dekalb County in 50 yard freestyle and 50 yard breaststroke at the championship meet. I was a late bloomer.

I continued swimming in college at Marymount University my freshman year. Coach Clark completely changed my stroke technique and I became much faster. I broke 3 individual school records and 4 relay records. After one year, I transferred to UGA and my career as a swimmer was over. My career as a swim coach was just beginning.

I coached the Leafmore Dolphins from 1993 to 1999. Our team was undefeated 5-0 in 1999, a feat that had not been accomplished at Leafmore in 30 years. The last time the Leafmore Dolphins were undefeated was in 1969. They were coached by another UGA graduate, Phil Houston, my Dad.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Coach Houston (my Dad) in red shorts on right 1969.
What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Coach Houston (me) on left in blue shorts 2009.

I returned to coach the Dolphins from 2006 to 2009. Once again, the team was undefeated 5-0. Leading the swim team at Leafmore was my favorite job.

Swimming led to many great opportunities including the chance to volunteer at the 1996 Olympics where I had full access to the pool deck and met some incredible athletes and people.

What Swimming Taught Me About Leadership
Meeting President Jimmy Carter at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. Swimming gave me countless opportunities.